Preparing Your Child for a Big Move | Parenting Tips

Preparing Your Child for a Big Move | Parenting Tips

A big move can be an exciting change for an adult, but for a child, moves are often filled with trepidation. Children are quick to create comfort zone. Every move is a transition into uncharted territory. The parenting tips below are designed to help you transition your child through a big move with ease.

Don’t Wait to Tell Your Child

You may be tempted to hold off the news for fear of your child’s reaction. However, it is much better to let your child know what is going to happen in advance so he or she can be mentally prepared. This also gives you time to discuss the positive elements of the move and answer any questions your child might have. If you wait too long, the move may seem more traumatic than it actually is.

Emphasize the Positive Elements of Moving

Your child might be worried about going to a new school, making new friends, and living in an unfamiliar place. Try to take the focus off that by mentioning the positives. Maybe the move will allow your child to have his or her own bedroom. Maybe the move gives you an opportunity to get a pet. Or perhaps the move is simply going to put you in a better place in life. Whatever the case may be, explain the benefits to your child so he or she has something to look forward to.

Be Careful When Packing

You may look at packing as an opportunity to get rid of some of your child’s old clothes and toys. This is a perfectly logical way of thinking, but your child made you at a different way. What he or she sees is you getting rid of other elements in the household, in addition to an already stressful change. You may want to pack and declutter while your child is at school, or you may wait to get rid of things after you move to the new house. Just be mindful of your child’s point of view during the process.

Give Honest Answers about Moving

Your child may have a lot of questions: Why are we moving? Will I go to a new school? What will happen to my friends? These questions may be tough to answer, but it’s important to tell as much of the truth as possible. Honesty may not yield a positive response at first, but your child will come to terms with it in time.

Take a Tour of the New House

If you have access to your new place before you move in, take your child there to see it. Let him or her know that this is going to be home, and get a feel for the place as a family. You can get the child excited about his or her new room and some of the new features in the house. This will make moving day seem less shocking.

There are many exciting opportunities coming for your family. Understand that this is just a small obstacle in an otherwise wonderful path. Provide comfort for your child in this time of need, and you can get through a move with little issues.